As a matter of personal values–I do not mourn dictators

My job is to comfort their victims, share their horrific deeds, and document their interminable exit

The metaphysical model of death is a three-way process–social withdrawal, biological (organ) shutdown, and psychological departure (mental exit). Former Zimbabwean leader Robert Mugabe has finally fulfilled these conditions at 95–two years after he was forced to relinquish power to end a disgusting 37-year rule.  


By Anthony Obi Ogbo


Mugabe’s final moments were a contrast to his years as a dictator.  His physical changes were vivid as he emaciated hourly. Grounded on his ailing bed in a treatment facility in faraway Singapore, this dictator watched his external world gradually diminished into a hopeless state that eventually lured him into his current perpetual sleep.  

Do not get me wrong: from that Austrian-born leader of the Nazi Party, Adolf Hitler, and the Killer-leader of the Soviet Union, Joseph Stalin, through Benito Mussolini of the Kingdom of Italy, every dictator, including Mugabe has a success story. He was an icon of freedom in Africa’s political fraternity. Undeniably, he is a pan-Africanist who once championed the liberation movement of his people. In fact, his influence on the history of Zimbabwe remains ineffaceable.   

Today, two years after his ejection from office, Mugabe is finally dead. He may not be allowed into Heaven because he would question God on why he created the White Race. Equally, he would be denied entry into hell because he might go there to seize their lands.  So where would the almighty Mugabe go?

But why would a dictator who once claimed the ownership of a country he ruled and abused for 37 years die in a treatment facility in another country? That is the characteristic of the African dictator who would deny their constituent healthcare but send their families abroad for treatment; who consequently would run down their education system and send their families to the most expensive schools in the west. Mugabe is no exception.

His leadership of the former British colony was red marked with bloodshed, persecution of political opponents and a pattern of large-scale election roguery. Mugabe watched his people perish under senseless political, social, and economic policies that triggered uncontrolled inflation, leaving his country the worst economy in the continent.  He shut down the opposition and tortured his critics as a hobby. He usually would invoke a pretentious “Blame-the-west” tactics to sidetrack his leadership woes.

His forced- resignation on November 21, 2017, made good news nationwide as Zimbabweans took to the street to celebrate an end to Mugabe’s dictatorship. He was 93 at the time and could not stand on his own for 20 seconds. Today, two years after his ejection from office, Mugabe is finally dead. He may not be allowed into Heaven because he would question God on why he created the White Race. Equally, he would be denied entry into hell because he might go there to seize their lands.  So where would the almighty Mugabe go?

I have nothing to do with their ailing moments. Thus, I have nothing to do with the death of Mugabe. As a matter of personal values–I do not mourn dictators. As a compassionate soul, my job is to comfort their victims. As a journalist, I have a duty to share their horrific deeds and document their interminable exit. I document and share spectacular images of their funerals and compile those deceiving eulogies by hypocrites that grace their funerals. Notwithstanding these values, I would say, Rest in Perfect Peace Mugabe.

Nevertheless such is life–a weird stage where distasteful clowns make appearances, perform and eventually leave. Mugabe played his role on this stage as a repentant self-made demigod, who annoyed peace until eventually, the blows of his wicked powers were subdued by death.

Please do not accuse me of mischievously being insensitive because that is not the intent. I have nothing to do with their ailing moments. Thus, I have nothing to do with the death of Mugabe. As a matter of personal values–I do not mourn dictators. As a compassionate soul, my job is to comfort their victims. As a journalist, I have a duty to share their horrific deeds and document their interminable exit. I document and share spectacular images of their funerals and compile those deceiving eulogies by hypocrites that grace their funerals. Notwithstanding these values, I would say, Rest in Perfect Peace Mugabe.

♦ Anthony Ogbo, PhD, Adjunct Professor at the Texas Southern University is the author of the Influence of Leadership (2015)  and the Maxims of Political Leadership (2019). Contact: anthony@guardiannews.us

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